Coming out after dating men

The app is the brain child of three school friends – Mr Buzzard, Edward Harvey and Sean Ferriter – who conceived the idea after hearing of their female friends' frustrations with existing dating apps.Mr Buzzard, 31, who founded Kalo Sport, a north London-based sports coaching service with Mr Harvey, said: 'We were hearing that some of our female friends were being made to feel uncomfortable in the workplace, when colleagues or even bosses were being flirtatious or asking them out after seeing them on dating apps.'It occurred to us that there was a gap in the market for an app that protects women's identities, and we knew men auto-swiping was an issue too so we set about designing an app that solved both problems.'Our market research also suggests women want to know upfront what men's intentions are – whether they are looking for a relationship or something more casual.'A 2016 study on Tinder users found men are much more likely to swipe right than women.Tinder's rival, Bumble, was created in 2014 with the intention of addressing the problem of 'ghosting', and was marketed as the first 'female-friendly' dating app.

Reveal has a simple to use browse and swipe layout but is different to the likes of Tinder and Bumble in that only male profiles are visible and females are initially hidden.This guarantees genuine matches by preventing men from liking every profile to 'play a numbers game' – which research suggests as many as a third do.This is frustrating for women who find many of their matches do not reply to their messages.As many as 80 per cent of male users who admitted to 'casually' liking most profiles said they swipe right on more than half of all the women they see.The researchers said that the trend might be explained by what is known as a 'feedback loop'.'Men see that they are matching with few people, and therefore become even less discerning: women, on the other hand, find that they match with most men, and therefore become even more discerning,' they wrote.

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